Fleshman Research Laboratory

Where PChem Wins!

About

Hello! My name is Allison Fleshman, and I am the physical chemistry professor at Lawrence University. It may seem shocking that a small liberal arts college can be at the forefront of scientific research, but it is true! My students and I are answering fundamental questions in physical chemistry and finding some fantastic results.  We recently presented these result at the National American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston (Aug 2015). I won’t ruin the surprise, so you will have to check out their research page (Students) to see what they found! But here’s a hint:

232323232fp83232>ydnjthgqubwsnrcgu8252>nu=38->238>WSNRCG=435;35;9;3329nu0mrj

The Fleshman Research Lab investigates transport properties of molecules in liquids. Transport properties include diffusion, conductivity, and viscosity. Together, my students and I are trying to answer the question: How do ions move in liquids?

We use the compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF), which models transport using a modified transition state theory, to determine activation energies. These activation energies help us understand the intermolecular interactions of the molecules as they move about in various ways.  The CAF uses the solution dielectric constant or the polarization (dipole density) of the liquid to determine these activation energies through a scaling procedure. The goal is to apply the CAF to a series of ionic liquid systems, which are liquid salts. That’s right! Ionic liquids are pure salts that are liquid, which means that if we want to know how ions move through liquids, what better way than studying a systems of pure ions in the liquid form!! To find out more check out Gus Lowry’s work on the Students page.

232323232fp83232>ydnjthgqubwsnrcgu58;4>nu=38->238>WSNRCG=435;36;374329nu0mrj

We also embrace the liberal arts! I am a trained vibrational spectroscopist. What that means is I am pretty good at talking to molecules, and with the right tools I can figure out which molecules are talking back. We are using that skill, and our new confocal Raman microscope to determine which molecules make up the pigments used in a 15th century illuminated manuscript in a collaboration with Dr. Ben Tilghman in the Lawrence Art History Department. Caren Sullivan is leading the charge with this project and has some great results, which she would love for you to see on the Students Page.

You can find my student’s weekly updates, or “wupdates” as they have been called on our home page. They are excited to share with you the science they have been doing! Enjoy!!

CV_Fleshman_2016

Publications

  1. Fleshman, A. M.; Petrowsky, M.; Frech, R.“Concentration dependence of molal conductivity and dielectric 
constant of 1-alcohol electrolytes using the compensated Arrhenius formalism” Journal of Physical Chemistry 
B, 2013, 117 (17), 5330-5337. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp312243d
  2. Petrowsky, M.; Fleshman, A. M.; Frech, R.“Application of the compensated Arrhenius formalism to 
fluidity data of polar organic liquids” Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2013, 117 (10), 2971-2978.
  3. Petrowsky, M.; Fleshman, A. M.; Frech, R.“Application of the Compensated Arrhenius Formalism to Fluidity Data of Polar Organic Liquids,” Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2013, 117, 2971-2978 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp312034e
  4. Petrowsky, M.; Fleshman, A. M.; Ismail, M.; Glatzhofer, D. T.; Bopege D. N.; Frech, R. “Molecular 
and system parameters governing mass and charge transport in polar liquids and electrolytes ,” Journal of 
Physical Chemistry B, 2012, 116 (33), 10098-10105.
  5. Petrowsky, M.; Fleshman, A. M.; Bopege D. N.; Frech, R. “Ion transport with charge-protected and 
non-charge protected cations using the compensated Arrhenius Formalism. Part 2. Relationship between 
ionic conductivity and diffusion” Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012, 116 (31), 9303-9309. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp3010585
  6. Petrowsky, M.; Fleshman, A. M.; Frech, R. “Ion transport with charge-protected and non-charge-protected cations in alcohol-based electrolytes using the compensated Arrhenius formalism. Part I: Ionic Conductivity 
and the Static Dielectric Constant” Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012, 116 (19), 5760-5765.
  7. Bopege, D. N.; Petrowsky, M.; Fleshman, A. M.; Frech, R.; Johnson, M. B. “Temperature dependence of ion transport in dilute tetrabutylammonium triflate-acetate solutions and self-diffusion in pure acetate 
liquids,” Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012, 116, 71-76. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jp208742h
  8. Fleshman, A. M.; Petrowsky, M.; Jernigen, J. D.; Bokalawela, R. S. P.; Johnson, M. B.; Frech, R.“Extending 
the compensated Arrhenius formalism to concentrated alcohol electrolytes: Arrhenius vs. non-Arrhenius be- 
havior,” Electrochimica Acta, 2011, 57, 147-152. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.electacta.2011.08.044
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: